Category Archives: Events

Tavistock Books Welcomes Samm Fricke to the Team!

Tavistock Books welcomes its newest member into the fold – Ms. Samm Fricke! After over a decade of experience in new/used book business, Samm is beginning the next phase of her life in the antiquarian book business – a step we are happy to watch her take, right here at Tavistock Books!

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Where are you from? Tell us a bit about yourself.

I grew up in Sonoma County, Ca.  I have worked in bookstores on the West Coast and East Coast for about 10 years.  I started this bookstore career endeavor after graduating high school when I concluded I did not want to go to college. My thought was why would I pay to learn and most likely go into debt when I can read what I want when I want and still make a living.  I don’t regret this decision.   Though most of these have been “new” bookstores, it was in Philadelphia where I finally started working at a general used bookstore as well as a public library, something I wanted to try for some time.

What is your favorite book and why? Do you have a favorite literary genre?

I have never been one to narrow things down to one favorite, whether a book, a record or a food.  I love the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy series, I do have the words ‘don’t panic’ tattooed on me.  Audre Lorde is a personal hero for me, Sister Outsider changed the way I think and move through the world; especially the essay The Transformation of Silence into Language and Action.  To sum it up though: literary fiction, science fiction, essays/criticism, social politics and music genre/musician biographies.

What drew you to rare books in the beginning? We know that this is not your first job in the book world, but it is your first job in the antiquarian book world! Tell us more about your book journey.

To be honest, I wasn’t necessarily drawn to antiquarian books specially, I was drawn to the book trade as a whole.  Being from the Bay Area I see technology exploding and the printed word is dying (though there are many people bring it back and preserving it now).  I started by getting a bookstore job instead of going to college but then that lead me to meet other book nerds, women who have been slinging books for 20 years, authors (local and well-kown) next thing I knew I was engulfed in a the multi-demensional world of books.  I told myself I wanted to dapple in a little bit everything regarding books and the printed word before I conclude what type of work I wanted to start on my own in the field.  So far I am moving right along.  I started with Copperfield’s in Sonoma County, then moved to Books, Inc. in Alameda for 8 years.  It was through Books, Inc. I met Michael Grant (childrens’ author of the GONE series) where I worked as his email assistant for a couple years. 

I moved to Brooklyn, NY in 2010 where I got a job at BookCourt in downtown Brooklyn, a family run literary bookshop.  After I came back from NY, I changed it up and worked as a secretary for a veterinarian (I also love animals!).  I needed to reassess, I needed to move onto something besides ‘new’ books. I then moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where I got a job with Curtis Kise at Neighborhood Books. He ran a general used book shop and he really taught me a lot in the year I worked with him. It was very different from the new book stores I had been working. As that was part-time I also (luckily!) got a job at a small community library- another side of books I wanted to explore.  Now I am back in the East Bay giving antiquarian books a try, so far it is not disappointing! 

What would you say is the neatest or most interesting bookstore/library that you have ever been inside of? What would you consider the most interesting book or item you’ve ever been exposed to in the antiquarian trade?

I have been visiting bookstores for years, in every city I have been in.  An independent bookstore is a work of art, it caters to a neighborhood, a specific genre or shows the personality of the owner/buyer.  Each one is unique, it’s difficult to pick one.  The big ones, The Strand and Powell’s are obviously amazing, but the smaller,  more intimate ones are very special to me i.e Modern Times (closed), Green Apple, Pegasus etc.   As for libraries, I use them regularly and visit them in each city.  They always strike me with their beauty, especially the older, main branches.  I actually have a favorite spot in the Oakland Public Library downtown, a hidden table in a corner by a window where I go to read or work.  The staircase at the Philadelphia Library (main branch) always makes me feel like royalty when walking it! 

As for the most interesting item or book I have seen in the antiquarian trade, I would have to say some art books and the local history books/items.  But honestly I have not been in the trade long enough to answer that question fully.

What are you most looking forward to with the position at Tavistock Books?  

There is so much I am looking forward to!  Cataloguing books will fill my desire and love for research, getting exposed to new titles that interest me that I otherwise would not have known existed and learning about book and paper production- I have a special interest in book making and repairing!

What do you think will be the toughest part of learning the antiquarian book business? And what do you think will be easy? 

The toughest part, based on what I have experienced in the past month with Tavistock Books, is learning all the different parts and materials of the books.  Pretty much just mastering the ABC for Book Collectors by John Cater.  Vic gave me this as required reading when I started and I just need to apply the terms and hold in my hands examples of them, which will come with time. The easiest is how to research titles, once I know all the resources I think it will be really fun and easy to gather information and pricing on titles.

Where do you eventually hope to take the position? Are you planning on using your knowledge of the book trade to open a business yourself one day, etc?

Like I mentioned earlier, I am trying out all the moving parts of the book business.  But I would like to open my own store some day, not sure much more beyond that. I am still in my learning stages, I think Tavistock Books is a great place to start in the antiquarian trade and I feel  honored that Vic gave me chance!

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Samm’s first foray into Tavistock Books was to recently assist Vic at the March Sacramento Antiquarian Book Fair!

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The Statute of Anne, and Other Copyright Tales

As antiquarian booksellers we all know what the copyright of a title is. We know where to find it, how to interpret it and what it means. But do we know how it came into being? I would venture to guess that more than a few of us are in the dark about how copyright laws came into existence to begin with! Today we would like to particularly focus on the Statute of Anne – otherwise known as the Copyright Act of 1710, which went into effect 308 years ago today – and how it drastically changed how copyright law worked in Great Britain, naming the author, rather than the publisher, as the holder of the copyright!

The crest of the Stationers Company in Great Britain.

The crest of the Stationers Company in Great Britain.

Prior to 1710, the law in effect in Great Britain was the Licensing of the Press Act 1662. Following the spread of the printing press brought over to the UK by William Caxton in 1476 (a prior blog on which you can read here), publishing and printing was widespread and copyright virtually nonexistent. The Licensing of the Press Act was enforced by a highly regarded guild of printers – the Stationers’ Company – who were given the “exclusive power to print and responsibility to censor literary works”. The censorship was thoroughly hated and disputed often, leading to public protests throughout Great Britain. As the Act needed to be renewed every two years to remain valid, authors and smaller printers protested its renewal repeatedly. Finally their efforts paid off in 1694, when Parliament refused to renew the Licensing Act, acknowledging that the ability of only a select few to print the works of an entire country had led to an unhealthy monopoly in the printing business.

After the dissolution of the Copyright Act, authors were finally able to join the fray - standing up beside the stationers/publishers petitioning Parliament for a new system. Jonathan Swift and Daniel Defoe were two of the most notable authors of the time calling for new licensing (in particular calling for authors to have power over their own work). In 1705 Defoe wrote that without current licensing, “One Man Studies Seven Year, to bring a finish’d Peice into the World, and a Pyrate Printer, Reprints his Copy immediately, and Sells it for a quarter of the Price … these things call for an Act of Parliament”. Suddenly the lobbyists saw an opportunity – rather than lobbying because they were losing out on profit due to lack of licensing, they chose to lobby for the authors instead – their “hearts-of-gold” (we use this term loosely) winning out in the end. They argued for licensing to be reinstated, but with reference to authors – to guarantee them an income – and arguing that without the ability to make a profit from their work, “learned men will be wholly discouraged from propagating the most useful Parts of Knowledge and Literature” (stationer John Howe, 1706).

With the sudden support of authors and other “learned men”, stationers had bigger and better forces and petitioned Parliament in both 1707 and 1709 to write a bill providing copyright to authors (and the publisher they are able to use, obviously). Parliament finally took note and, whatever the motivations of the passage, a bill was finally passed on April 5th, 1710, and is known as the Statute of Anne due to its being passed during Queen Anne’s reign. It consisted of 11 main sections, and its most important and obvious part was the right to copy, “to have sole control over the printing and reprinting of books”, [with no provision to benefit the owner of this right after the sale. Problematic]. The right would “automatically be given to the author as soon as it was published, although they had the ability to license these rights to another person or company.”

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Though the Statute of Anne was by no means perfect, and lawsuits arose after copyrights expired and other booksellers began printing works that had been copyrighted but not re-upped… yaddah, yaddah – it was absolutely the first time that the treatment of authors by printers was recognized and the first step toward a more public law - pressing for less monopoly on printing and therefore, simultaneously, easier spread of the written word.

 

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Celebrating Women Authors on Maya Angelou’s Birthday

We recently saw an interesting article online, detailing the “Best Female Authors” of all time. On this, what would be Dr. Maya Angelou’s 90th birthday, we would like to channel her inner strength and power as a leading poet, singer, memoirist, and civil rights activist and honor some of the most famous female authors of all time.

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Top Twenty-Five Female Authors of All Time in One Sentence or Less

Followed by the First Sentence or So Found about these Powerful Ladies on the Internet (A Rather Fascinating Social Experiment, No?)

(Obviously Debatable, but these names are based on Book Sales and those found to be Classics Today)

Jane Austen:an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century.”

Virginia Woolf:an English writer, who is considered one of the foremost modernist authors of the 20th century and a pioneer in the use of stream of consciousness as a narrative device.”

Charlotte Bronte:is one of the most famous Victorian women writers, only two of her poems are widely read today, and these are not her best or most interesting poems.”

Agatha Christie:Lady Mallowan, DBE was an English writer. She is known for her 66 detective novels and 14 short story collections, particularly those revolving around her fictional detectives Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple.”

Mary Shelley:an English novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer, best known for her Gothic novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus (1818).”

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Louisa May Alcott:was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania on November 29, 1832. She and her sisters Anna, Elizabeth, and [Abba] May were educated by their father, teacher/philosopher A. Bronson Alcott, and raised on the practical Christianity of their mother, Abigail May.”

J.K. Rowling:is the creator of the Harry Potter fantasy series, one of the most popular book and film franchises in history.”

George Eliot (Mary Anne Evans):was an English novelist, poet, journalist, translator and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era.”

Emily Dickinson:is one of America’s greatest and most original poets of all time.”

Sylvia Plath:was one of the most dynamic and admired poets of the 20th century.”

Toni Morrison:American writer noted for her examination of black experience (particularly black female experience) within the black community.”

Margaret Atwood:is a Canadian poet, novelist, literary critic, essayist, inventor, and environmental activist.”

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Elizabeth Gaskell:often referred to as Mrs Gaskell, was an English novelist, biographer, and short story writer.”

Willa Cather:established a reputation for giving breath to the landscape of her fiction.”

Dorothy Parker:was an American poet, writer, critic, and satirist, best known for her wit, wisecracks and eye for 20th-century urban foibles.”

Gertrude Stein:was an American author and poet best known for her modernist writings, extensive art collecting and literary salon in 1920s Paris.”

Ursula Le Guin: an “immensely popular author who brought literary depth and a tough-minded feminist sensibility to science fiction and fantasy with books like ‘The Left Hand of Darkness’” 

Isabel Allende:s a Chilean-American writer. Allende, whose works sometimes contain aspects of the genre of “magical realism,” is famous for novels such as The House of the Spirits (La casa de los espíritus, 1982) and City of the Beasts (La ciudad de las bestias, 2002), which have been commercially successful.”

Edna St. Vincent Millay:received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923, the third woman to win the award for poetry, and was also known for her feminist activism.”

Mary Wollstonecraft: “an English writer and passionate advocate of educational and social equality for women.”

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Alice Walker:is a Pulitzer Prize-winning, African-American novelist and poet most famous for authoring ‘The Color Purple.’”

Maya Angelou:an impactful civil rights leader who collaborated with Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X during the Civil Rights movement. “

Judy Blume:spent her childhood in Elizabeth, NJ, making up stories inside her head. She has spent her adult years in many places, doing the same thing, only now she writes her stories down on paper.”

Betty Friedan: “a leading figure in the women’s movement in the United States, her 1963 book The Feminine Mystique is often credited with sparking the second wave of American feminism in the 20th century.”

Thank you to these powerful, courageous and wonderful writers for their influence on female empowerment!

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Oops, Jim Kay Did it Again! A Briefing on the Sacramento Book Fair

by Vic Zoschak Jr.

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Jim Kay did it again!  “What?”, you ask?  Nothing less than host the umpteenth million [or so it seems] successful Sacramento  book fair!  Seriously, in one iteration or another, I’ve been attending this book fair since the mid-1980s.  For northern California bibliophiles especially, it’s a local gem.  Jim [pun intended] resurrected the fair a decade or so ago when it, like many other regional book fairs, was falling prey to the spread of internet book-buying.  Under Jim’s guidance, it’s now a vibrant local fair that consistently draws a good crowd, not to mention, exhibitors, who hail from as far away as Seattle, LA, and Salt Lake City.

IMG_4103This particular fair was also memorable for another reason…  it was the first ever for my new assistant, Samm Fricke.  Samm came on board last Wednesday.  Yes, you read that right, she’d only been in my employ for 2 days before I whisked her off to help me man the Tavistock Books’ booth.  She did great!  And the good ship Tavistock…?  The buying was great*; sales, not so much.  But that said, unless someone buys out your booth, there’s always room for improvement, isn’t there?

Finally, one attractive aspect of this fair that it shares with others-  interaction with colleagues.  The Friday night dinner has become tradition, and this year was no different.  That night, eight of us gathered at a local restaurant, Roxie, to dine, converse & just generally relax after a long day of set-up.  For me, this is one of the allures that keeps me coming back… the camaraderie shared at that Friday night dinner.   As they used to say in that one commercial, “priceless”.

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See you in September.

IMG_4105* watch for our New Acquisitions list…  lots of interesting material will be coming your way!

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A Congress. A Book Fair. A Blog.

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$400,000.00  Could I sell my first born male child to fund this purchase?  OMG, I so want[ed] this book.  But I leap ahead, for that yearning comes later in the week…  the week, actually 11 days, started with a road trip.  A Vanilla road trip, but nevertheless, a road trip.  Saturday morning, the 3rd of February, Peaches dropped me off at my colleague’s shop in Walnut Creek, Swan’s Fine Books.  Luggage was transferred.  WC calls were made, and Laurelle & I headed south.  Pasadena bound.  Yes, we both were attending the 2018 ILAB Congress, being held in lovely Pasadena California.  The drive was pleasant, conversation exchanged, and other than 2 idiot drivers doing their best to side-swipe us [Laurelle alertly avoided both.  Thank you God], uneventful. 

The Congress started with a tour of Old Town Pasadena at 2 pm Sunday.  I arrived in the lobby promptly at 1:58.  2:00 pm, no guide.  2:03 pm, no guide.  2:10 pm, Brad Johnson explaining the guide had been confirmed, and the committee’s check cashed, but still no guide.  2:20 pm, no guide.  2:30 pm, I moseyed on over to the bar, where I found Laurelle, and we had a glass of Chardonnay.  And a second glass, to down the crab cakes.  A 3rd glass was contra-indicated.  The guide never showed.  I felt for Brad [and Jen, the Congress organizers]… was this a harbinger of the 3 days ahead?

IMG_3944No.  IT WAS WONDERFUL!  We went to the Clark.  We went to the Huntington.  We went to the Getty.  We went to the Herrick.  AND we went to the Petersen Car Museum!!  Can you say awesome!  OMG, the cars!  And there was a Porsche exhibit on!  Did I tell you I have an ’82 911SC [the “P Car”] and a ’94 964 Carrera 2 convertible [“Miz White”].  In other words, I was in 7th heaven!  

I could write this entire blog on that museum tour, but I’ll just say the coolest car seen, in my not so humble opinion [IMNSHO], was Steve McQueen’s Jaguar XJSS.  I swooned.

This visit was Wednesday am, and to be honest, I was sorely tempted to join the Congress afternoon group, so I could revisit the Petersen and see those cars I missed… but no, I stuck with my morning group, and was glad I did, for we went to the Herrick.  Howard Prouty, ABAA member, is also ‘the guy’, at this Academy Library.  Many treasures there, and I was glad to see them [fwiw, they house Peaches’ father-in-law’s papers, that being Irving Brecher, who wrote the screenplay for Meet Me in St Louis.  Those weren’t on display.  I survived the disappointment].

IMG_3961Wednesday night.  Gawd, I had to put on a suit.  It was the Congress “Gala Dinner”.  It’s California… couldn’t I go in shorts & flops?  Evidently not.  Ok, B-Squared it was.  Peaches said I clean up pretty well, your call if she’s right.  And really, it was a nice evening.  A palatable meal, lovely dinner companions, engaging conversation and dancing!  Whoohoo, been a while, let me tell you!  However, I did not go to the Presidential suite after…  getting a bit too advanced in my years to stay up till 3 am, as some of our younger members did.  

Thursday dawned, Congress over, the 51st ABAA California Antiquarian Book Fair about to begin.  Book fairs are funny animals.  They can cheer you, they can humble you, they can confound you, they can elate you.  This one was no different.  It was the first for my assistant Cassie.  She has a nice eye… her responsibility was booth set-up, and a great job she did. 

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Did I say we had adjoining booths with Swan’s Fine Books & Churchill Book Collector?  We did.  30 feet of dazzling material.  And how’d we do you ask?  Well, we sold some, and we bought some.  Like I told folks at the fair who inquired, “I didn’t crash ‘n burn, but I didn’t soar with the eagles either.”

IMG_3984Before I leave Pasadena, I should mention poker.  Anybody out there play?   James Bryant does, and he’s the new ABAA champion at Texas Hold’em.  In case you weren’t aware, the ABAA hosts a benefit poker tournament during the CA Book Fair.  Proceeds help fund the ABAA’s Elisabeth Woodburn Education Fund, which sends young[ish] booksellers to CABS, RBS, CALRBS, etc…. I’ve been told over $6000 was raised that evening.  While I was happy to contribute my $$ to a worthy cause, I confess, I didn’t make it past the second table.  lol

It’s now Thursday, Februay 15th.  Cassie & I are back in Alameda, those books not sold are reshelved, and we’re getting back into the daily routine.  Put another one in the books.  Next year, Oakland.  2020, the ILAB Congress is in Amsterdam.  Count ME in!

And oh, what was that $400,000 book…?  Shakespeare’s Second Folio.  Original, unsophisticated, in a period binding, with an enviable provenance.  In the booth across from mine.  Christopher, I’ll be calling if I win the lottery.

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The Tavistock Books Educational Scholarship is Up for Grabs!

So, you’re a somewhat new[ish] antiquarian bookseller, who just got in a fairly uncommon 18th C. book on conjuring…  and you ask yourself, is there a reference one could consult regarding same, that would give the pagination scheme, and number of required plates?  YES!  In this case, Raymond Stott’s BIBLIOGRAPHY OF ENGLISH CONJURING, 1581 – 1876.  

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Of course, that question of where to go, what reference to use, can come into play for a number of authors, subjects, time-periods, whathaveyou.  The solution:  RBS course L-25.

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Joel Silver, the Director of the renowned Lilly Library, University of Indiana, has been teaching this course for around a decade now.  From the RBS Course description, here’s what he covers during the week:

This course presents a systematic introduction to approximately 350 printed and electronic reference sources for researching rare books. Emphasis will be placed on sources in the fields of early printed books; British and American literature; historical Americana; voyages and travels; maps and atlases; science and medicine; and the book arts. In class sessions, the instructor will cover details related to the compilation of each of the sources and will provide information about their strengths and weaknesses, as well as strategies on how they can be used effectively. Students will receive listings containing bibliographical information on the sources discussed, along with reproductions of selected pages or entries from some of the sources.

The course is intended for special collections librarians, antiquarian booksellers, and collectors, at all levels, who are interested in finding out more about the books in their care. Although there are no prerequisites, a basic understanding of the principles of descriptive bibliography would be helpful.

I’ve personally taken this course.  The course is wonderful, Joel is nothing short of amazing, and even better for you, since I so believe in both the course & its instructor, I’ll pay the course tuition for an up-n-coming bookseller.  Yep, the Tavistock Books Educational Scholarship is for Joel’s course.  From the last paragraph of the RBS course description:

The Tavistock Books Educational Scholarship is a full-tuition scholarship opportunity that is available to all antiquarian booksellers interested in taking this course. For more information, please visit the Tavistock Scholarship page.

So, this blog, in essence, a scholarship announcement.  If you’re a bookseller, they say success depends on two factors: what you know, and who you know.  Both can be obtained at RBS, in this case, tuition-paid.  Applications now being accepted.

Questions?  vjz@tavbooks.com

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Booksellers, Raffles and Wine, Oh My!

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                        The Berkeley City Club – a beautiful venue, as usual!

What could be better than a group of bibliophiles gathered together in a single room to celebrate the holiday season? A group of booksellers gathered together in a single room celebrating the holiday season with good food and a raffle of lots of alcohol, that’s what! Just kidding! In all honesty though we all (as adults) enjoy our bottles of wine and bourbon, what we truly enjoy is spending time with like-minded individuals. The NCC Chapter of the ABAA Holiday Dinner was no exception!

IMG_20171205_192028This year the bar, being held in the same large room as the dinner, seemed to be a bit more of an intimate affair (which I rather enjoyed). The large table of donations for the Elizabeth Woodburn / ABAA Benevolent Fund raffle was overflowing – as usual with impressive selections of beverages, but with also some fun gift baskets and chocolates, 2018 SF Giants baseball tickets, etc., etc!  Many raffle tickets were sold (most to our table mates John Windle and co., in my opinion – winners galore!!!) But I get ahead of myself. 

First things first Michael Hackenberg, the Chapter Chair, introduced the evening with his wit and charm. Minutes of the last meeting were approved, and one great new piece of information that was praised was the recent repeal of the most egregious parts of the California law on signed material. Unfortunately getting the bill repealed has cost quite a bit of funds for the ABAA, most of which were spent on lobbyists! But in any case, everyone is quite happy that we are on our way to normality back in the signed and autographed world of rare books. Another topic of interest covered is that the ILAB Congress in LA next year is close to being sold out! There are possibly one or two more seats to be had, and those who have been agree that it is a wonderful destination work-trip for any book related people. Over 100 people have signed up thus far. 

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An image of a very happy (possible) ABAA President?!

New members of the ABAA board will soon be voted on! Members of the NCC that are up for nomination in different positions include our very own Vic Zoschak [as President], Michael Hackenberg [as our Chapter Rep],  Brad Johnson & Scott deWolfe are both competing for the ABAA VP slot, and Peter Blackman is on the ballot as Association Treasurere. The NCC Board includes Andrew Langer as the new treasurer, Alexander Akin continuing on as Secretary, Laurelle Swan as the new Vice Chair, and Ben Kinmont as the new Chair! Congratulations to these four! Another interesting topic included the different showcases touted by several booksellers for this upcoming year include the Bibliography week showcase in January and the RBMS showcase in New Orleans! Last but not least, the upcoming fair in Pasadena in February has one of the highest registrations for several years, with over 200 booksellers registered to exhibit at this time. Woohoo!

In all, the dinner, the chat, the raffle interspersed between rounds of discussion (a great new idea, in my not so humble opinion), and the camaraderie always found in this group of people made for a wonderful holiday evening. 

And to all a good night! (Or afternoon… you catch my drift.)

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